30 Mar
A vehicular office is mobile, but potentially dangerous.

Is your vehicle also an office?

We live in a connected world. Calls, texts and emails all act as a way to bring us closer together – both personally and in business. The lines between the office and the home are increasingly becoming blurred, and the same can be said of vehicles.

From staying connected with Bluetooth to paying costs with fuel cards, there are all sorts of ways that technology could be turning your car into a highly functional office.

More and more workers are using their cars as mobile offices.More and more workers are using their cars as mobile offices.

The mobile world

And there are certainly benefits that come with this odd change of professional location. A recent global survey from Regus found that almost one in five people were happy to send short emails in their car, while they were also far happier to take phone calls in their privacy of a vehicle rather than the popular alternative of a local cafe.

"Only 2 per cent of Kiwi respondents would make sensitive phone calls in a cafe, while 36 per cent were happy to do so in a car," said Regus New Zealand Area Director Pierre Ferrandon.

Mr Ferrandon also went on to say that one in eight workers were open to doing essential work duties while in a car. Staying connected to a business even while on the move can offer a chance to stay efficient, while also providing a means to stay mobile and keep an enterprise on the move.

Safety first

Talking to passengers, accessing your GPS and other common driver activities all acted as contributing factors to an increased likelihood of a crash.

However, while it may be more convenient, using your car as an office could also be dangerous – unless you take adequate precautions, of course.

The New Zealand Transport Agency can tell us precisely how dangerous driver distractions from things like mobile phones can be. In one year, 34 deaths and 204 serious injuries were reported as a result of driver distraction, while simply engaging with a text message made it 23 times more likely for someone to be involved in a crash.

Meanwhile, talking to passengers, accessing your GPS and other common driver activities all acted as contributing factors to an increased likelihood of a crash.

Thankfully, there are plenty of options for those who want to remain mobile. The quintessential hands-off technologies of Bluetooth headsets should be a regular sight in all of your vehicles, while maintaining excellent safety standards among your drivers and vehicles are integral too.

Technology is making us all more connected, but true safety is still entirely within the hands of human drivers (for now, at least). So stay safe, stay connected, and remember to keep your costs down with a fuel card!